Upcoming Exhibitions

2014-2015 Academic Year

Latin American and Latino Art at the Allen
Ellen Johnson Gallery
September 2, 2014–June 28, 2015

This fall, for the first time, the AMAM showcases its Latin American collection in a comprehensive exhibition of 115 modern and contemporary works. Represented are artists from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, and Uruguay, as well as those with Latino roots working in the United States. Ranging from Mexican Revolution-era prints by Diego Rivera to recent conceptual installations, the exhibition features works by such major figures as Enrique Chagoya, Alfredo Jaar, José Clemente Orozco, Roberto Matta, Ana Mendieta, and Doris Salcedo.

An accompanying catalogue chronicles how the Latin American collection began in the 1930s and was shaped, in part, through gifts from individual collectors who championed art from this region. Organized by Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Denise Birkhofer, Latin American and Latino Art at the Allen will anchor the AMAM’s yearlong theme: “The Americas.”

Related exhibition:
avaf@AMAM
Baron Gallery
February - April 2015
Opening night event: Feb. 20, 2015

This installation will feature multi-media works from the AMAM collection by the artist collective assume vivid astro focus (Eli Sudbrack [Brazilian, b. 1968] and Christophe Hamaide-Pierson [French, b. 1973]), known for their psychedelic, carnavalesque installations of diverse and colorful pop imagery.

 

Life and Art in Early America
Stern Gallery
September 2, 2014–June 28, 2015

The first 100 years of the United States witnessed a complex history of discovery and division. Drawing upon the AMAM’s remarkable collection of 19th-century American art, this exhibition reflects the variety and vastness of the cultural, racial, and natural landscapes of the United States. Portraits, landscape paintings, photography, textiles, decorative arts, works on paper, and sculpture illustrate the entrepreneurship, struggle, and sacrifice invested in the formation of a nation.

An Insider’s Lens: The Jazz Photography of Milt Hinton
Ripin Gallery
September 2–December 23, 2014

Viewers get an intimate look at the life and work of some of the jazz greats of the 20th century in this exhibition of 99 photographs taken by jazz bassist Milt Hinton. As a jazz insider with a career spanning 70 years, Hinton photographed such important figures as Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane, Cab Calloway, Billie Holiday, and Aretha Franklin. A compelling group of images from the 1940s records the experience of being an African-American musician on the road in the segregated South. The works are on loan from The Milton J. Hinton Photographic Collection in New York.

Milt Hinton, 1959   © Photograph by Chuck Stewart

Hugo Brehme’s Mexico
Ripin Gallery
September 2–December 23, 2014

After settling in Mexico in 1905, German-born Hugo Brehme became known for his photographs of the Mexican land, people, and customs. His photographs, rendered in a Pictorialist style that sought to emulate the aesthetic of painting, were often produced as postcards and widely disseminated abroad. Brehme’s vision of Mexico is explored in more than 70 works recently added to the AMAM collection, which depict Pre-Columbian sites, Catholic churches, rural landscapes, and urban vistas.

The War to End All Wars: WWI through Recent Acquisitions
Ripin Gallery
September 2–December 23, 2014

In conjunction with the centennial of World War I, works new to the museum collection address one of the greatest conflicts in modern history. Prints by French artists Guy Arnoux and Jean-Emile Laboureur include wartime propaganda, as well as depictions of life on the battlefield and home front. Black-and-white photographs by American contemporary artist Jim Riswold—based on actual images of two of the bloodiest battles of the war—recreate the feel of documentary photography and suggest rugged landscapes through his witty monumentalizing of foodstuffs and miniature soldiers.

 

The Art of Disney Animation
Education Hallway
September 2 - December 23, 2014

In 1932, the Walt Disney Company signed a contract with Technicolor to utilize their new three strip color film process. Combined with their revolutionary animation processes, this deal allowed the company to produce for the first time full-color animated features. What followed was a golden age of screen animation, as over the next decade they released Snow White, Pinocchio, Fantasia, and Dumbo. This focus exhibition will display sketches and animation cells from these features.

 

 

ONGOING INSTALLATIONS

Modern Works from the Permanent Collection
Stern Gallery
Opens September 2, 2014

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner’s Self-Portrait as a Soldier goes on view once again after being part of highly acclaimed German and British exhibitions on World War I. The Kirchner painting joins other AMAM favorites such as Paul Cézanne’s Viaduct at L’Estaque, Amedeo Modigliani’s Nude with Coral Necklace, and Henri Matisse’s Young Girl Seated. Three-dimensional works include Pablo Picasso’s bronze Head of a Woman (Fernande Olivier) and Alexander Calder’s kinetic Yellow Stalk.

 

Pre-Columbian Ceramics at the Allen
East Gallery
Opens September 2, 2014

As part of the yearlong “The Americas” theme at the AMAM, Pre-Columbian ceramics from Mexico, Costa Rica, and Peru are on view. The selection includes Moche vessels embellished with human and animal forms and Mayan and Teotihuacán funerary objects.

 

Asian Art at the Allen: American Collectors in the Early 20th Century
South Ambulatory and East Gallery
Opens September 2, 2014

Why was Asian art so attractive to American collectors in the first half of the 20th century? A number of prominent donors to the AMAM collection of Asian art are highlighted, including Charles Lang Freer, whose better known gift to the Smithsonian Institution provided impetus for the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington DC, and Mary A. Ainsworth, an Oberlin alumna who quietly amassed one of the most important American collections of Japanese woodblock prints of her era. These installations offer a preview of this spring’s Ripin Gallery exhibition focusing solely on the Ainsworth bequest of more than 1,500 Japanese prints.